Is there a there in cyberspace

Lewis By Bradley Peniston Tweet By Brett Williams Assured access to cyberspace is a key enabler of national security, so the answer to the question in the title is: Two of the defining characteristics of a strong, modern, industrial nation are economic prosperity and a credible defense.

Is there a there in cyberspace

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Is There a There in Cyberspace? By John Perry Barlow guidepost discussion questions thinking critically writing topics I am often asked how I went from pushing cows around a remote Wyoming ranch to my present occupation which Wall Street Journal recently described as "cyberspace cadet".

Unlike most modern Americans, I grew up in an actual place, an entirely nonintentional community called Pinedale, Wyoming. As I struggled for nearly a generation to keep my ranch in the family, I was motivated by the belief that such places were the spiritual home of humanity. But I knew their future was not promising.

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The majority of us lived in towns like Pinedale. Now fewer than 1 percent of us extract a living from the soil. We just became too productive for our own good. Farming and ranching communities are now home to a demographically insignificant percentage of Americans, the vast majority of whom live not in ranch houses but in more or less identical split-level "ranch homes" in more or less identical suburban "communities.

I believe the combination of television and suburban population patterns is simply toxic to the soul. I see much evidence in contemporary America to support this view.

I started looking around for evidence that community in America would not perish altogether. The Deadheads lacked place, touching down briefly wherever the band happened to be playing, and they lacked continuity in time, since they had to suffer a new diaspora every time the band moved on or went home.

But they had many of the other necessary elements of community, including a culture, a religion of sorts which, though it lacked dogma, had most of the other, more nurturing aspects of spiritual practicea sense of necessity, and, most importantly, shared adversity.

Better, this was a place I could visit without leaving Wyoming. After a lot of struggling with modems, serial cables, init strings, and other computer arcana that seemed utterly out of phase with such notions as Deadheads and small towns, I found myself looking at the glowing yellow word "Login: There was, it seemed, everything one might find going on in a small town, save dragging Main Street and making out on the back roads.

I felt I had found the new locale of human community--never mind that the whole thing was being conducted in mere words by minds from whom the bodies had been amputated.

Never mind that all these people were deaf, dumb, and blind as paramecia or that their town had neither seasons nor sunsets nor smells. The featureless log-in handles would gradually acquire video faces and thus expressionsshaded 3-D body puppets and thus body language.

This "space," which I recognized at once to be a primitive form of the cyberspace William Gibson predicted in his sci-fi novel Neuromancer, was still without apparent dimensions or vistas. But virtual reality would change all that in time. They had a place where their hearts could remain as the companies they worked for shuffled their bodies around America.

They could put down roots that could not be ripped out by forces of economic history. They had a collective stake.

Is there a there in cyberspace

They had a community. In that time, I co-founded an organization, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, dedicated to protecting its interests and those of other virtual communities like it from raids by physical government. Many of the near-term benefits I anticipated from it seem to remain as far in the future as they did when I first logged in.

Perhaps they always will. I think he is right about this and that perhaps the central question of the virtual age is whether or not prana can somehow be made to fit through any disembodied medium.

It is at the heart of the fundamental and profound difference between information and experience. Jaron Lanier has said that "information is alienated experience," and, that being true, prana is part of what is removed when you create such easily transmissible replicas of experience as, say, the evening news.

In short, most of the things that make my life real to me. Also mostly missing are the illiterate and the continent of Africa.There isnot much human diversity in Cyberspace, consisting as it largely does of white males under 50 with plenty of computer terminal time, great typing skills, high math SAT's, strongly held opinions on just about everything, and an excruciating face to face shyness, especially with the opposite sex.

Amongst individuals on cyberspace, there is believed to be a code of shared rules and ethics mutually beneficial for all to follow, referred to as cyberethics. Many view the right to privacy as most important to a functional code of cyberethics.

There is not much human diversity in cyberspace, which is populated, as near as I can tell, by white males under 50 with plenty of computer terminal time, great typing skills, high math SATs, strongly held opinions on just about everything, and an excruciating face-to .

Is there a there in cyberspace

There is not much human diversity in cyberspace, which is populated, as near as I can tell, by white males under 50 with plenty of computer terminal time, great typing skills, high math SATs, strongly held opinions on just about everything, and an excruciating face-to .

There are few activities and places that we approach that are not in one way or another tied into cyberspace. On a small scale, matters such as your home, work, hospitals, schools and even a lot of restaurants are tied into cyberspace.

But Pinedale works, more or less, as it is, and there is a lot which is still missing from the communities of Cyberspace, whether they be places like the WELL, the fractious newsgroups of USENET, the silent "auditoriums"of American Online, or even enclaves on the promising World Wide Web.

A VIRTUAL COMMONPLACE: Is There a There in Cyberspace?